rifle "shot out" - how to tell?

Discussion in 'Rifle Talk' started by Native, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. Native

    Native Member

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    I've got my eye on a used BAR in .243, but I've been told to be aware of used semi's because they're likely "shot out" and wouldn't be accurate anymore.
    What's to this? I guess the barrel could be re-crowned at minimal expense, but is there any more to this "shot out" business?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Dirigo

    Dirigo Well-Known Member

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    when someone says a gun is shot out, they really mean the barrel is shot out. it takes it will take thousands of rounds to shoot out a barrel, unless you are a benchrest competitor or you use very high velocity cartridges. a recrown wont salve the problem of a shot out barrel, since the damage is the the throat. chances are the gun you are looking at is fine. semi autos are no more likely to be shot out than any other action type
     

  3. Native

    Native Member

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    Is there a way to tell if the throat is shot out?

    In my neck of the woods, it seems that everyone that has a semi-auto makes a poor first shot and then empties the clip trying to make another connecting shot - usually fruitless. Very few one-shot kills.
    So it seems to me that a semi-auto would end up getting shot out quicker than a bolt-action would.
     
  4. Dirigo

    Dirigo Well-Known Member

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    it will take a very long time to shoot the barrel out of a 243.
    the way i see it, the barrel of a guy who makes a poor first shot and just empties the mag on the animal will have less wear than one owned buy someone who is a good shot, since the bad shot obviously doesnt practice.it is highly unlikely that an average guy will wear out a barrel in his lifetime.
     
  5. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    First you have to know what to look for and I have seen many shot-out barrels that I couldn't tell for sure,the only way is with a boroscope,you can use a borelight and see alot of the throat,where most problems occur,but you won't be able to see the whole barrel.If the grooves and lands are not readily seen in the throat then a shot out throat may mean a shot out barrel also.Thats the delima most gun buyers have to face when looking for a used gun.Invest in a borelight(most cost less than 20.00)and look at a new rifle and then look at the one your looking at,that should give you a good idea of how it should look.Good luck.Drop-Shot
     
  6. Wyo. Coyote Hunter

    Wyo. Coyote Hunter Super Member

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    :D The rifles in front of the chamber should be sharp. A dark rough area there could mean it has had lots of rounds down the barrel. :cry: I am not sure how a guy could easily check and auto, I have never owned one. :D One thing I WOULD CHECK IS TO SEE IF THERE IS ANY PITTING. These would be dark "marks" in the bore. More rifles are ruined from neglect that shooting :!: As far as rounds in a .243, I had one with 3,500 rounds through it. The bore showed wear, but it still shot fine. I had a pal who shot his .243 out in I would guess 4000-6000 rounds. He didn't keep close track :wink: Fast .22 calibers often go with in 4000-5000 rounds of shooting especially if you are shooting prairie dogs, etc. :lol: :wink:
     
  7. Native

    Native Member

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    O.K.. Thanks for the info. guys. I think that gives me enough to work with. I believe y'all are right - it would be highly unlikely that the rifle would be shot out.
     
  8. APEXDUCK

    APEXDUCK Well-Known Member

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    I would expect to see significant exterior wear on the gun if the barrel was shot out. Lots of blueing wear and worn spots on the stock's checkering as well. If in doubt have it looked over by and good gun smith.

    APEXDUCK
     
  9. huntswithdogs

    huntswithdogs Moderator

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    Barrels don't get "shot out" by us regular hunter/shooter guys.

    When you get bench rest guys talking about a shot out barrel,it just means that thier groups have opened up by 1/1000 of an inch and they can no longer win. The accuracy they still get would make us regular guys quite happy.

    I've been shooting the same 243 for about 25 years and it ain't even close to "shot out". I've been sold more than one "shot out" gun that just needed all the copper-buildup washed from the barrel.

    Do yourself a favor,buy a boltgun or single shot. Learn to make the first shot count. PRACTICE,PRACTICE,PRACTICE!!! Spray and pray doesn't make for a very responsible hunter.
    Just my 2 cents worth , but I felt it needed to be addressed. Hope I didn't step on too many toes.

    HWD
     
  10. killerb

    killerb Well-Known Member

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    I have a BAR in .280Rem. It is a fine looking and fine performing rifle. I have a Leupold VX-II 2-7X mounted on it. I bought it when I was 14 with money I made detasseling corn. It likes to string its groups vertically. I had to have a semi-auto because my dad and uncle both used semi-autos, Winchester Model 100s in .308Win. None of us subscribe to the "spray and pray" method. All of my deer have been taken with one shot. Follow up shots were taken if the deer didn't go down immediately and I never emptied my magazine. That said, I really wish I had bought a good short action bolt gun instead. I am now in the market for a Kimber 84M Montana in .308. Save yourself the time and money, get a good bolt action and practice with it. Semi-autos make fun plinkers and good combat rifles, but leave a bit to be desired as a hunting rifle.
     
  11. Native

    Native Member

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    I've already got a bolt action rifle - an A-bolt Medallion in .270 that I'm a flat-out sniper with. I've had it for over 15 years and took it to a gunsmith who did an outstanding trigger job on it. Best $45 I've ever spent on any firearm. Unfortunately, it too strings shots vertically. Bad enough that I really have to think about that second shot if I'm shooting at 200 yds. or more. It's most accurate with a 130 gr. Hornady SST in it.

    I've just stumbled across the .243 in semi-auto and it looks like it would be a fun caliber to plink and varmint hunt with.

    I just wish I could load my .270 down with a much smaller bullet to varmint hunt and such with.
     
  12. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Native if I were you I would take the barreled action out and see if there are any shiny spots in the forearm where the barrel is touching.I have fixed all the rifles I had string shots except 1,I sanded the forearm but not enough and the browning BLR still strings but way under 1 1/2 inch for a 5 shot group,a three shot group shoots a hair over 1 inch so I'm not in a hurry to do that again,the BLR is a pain to take apart but your bolt action would be easy.Just a thought.Drop-Shot
     
  13. killerb

    killerb Well-Known Member

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    Well, if you already have a good bolt gun and you want that BAR in .243, then by all means, buy it! It sounds like you really want it and you are waiting for someoone to talk you out of it. Well, you are in the wrong place for that, my friend. I don't think anyone here will say not to buy a gun. Thats heresy. As has been stated above, it takes many thousands of rounds to "shoot out" a barrel. I seriously doubt that the barrel is shot out. If it is bad, I would think it is more likely due to pitting and corrosion from a lack of cleaning and maintenance.
     
  14. Shuck M.

    Shuck M. Member

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    Don't mean to hijack, but is there anything you can do to prevent throat errosion due to gas cutting? I'm pretty sure the answer is NO, but figured I'd throw the question out there. I'm referring to a 139 gr bullet in the 7mm Mauser, as opposed to using the bigger 170+gr bullets.
    Any experience with this?
    Thanks.
     
  15. Wyo. Coyote Hunter

    Wyo. Coyote Hunter Super Member

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    :D When you shoot, there will be gas cutting. It is enhanced by more powder, I would suppose fast powder, boat tails, rate of fire. One thing I was told by Serria, is that heavier bullets erode more than light ones because it is harder to get them moving. I would suppose the erosion would be slight, but I found it interesting. With my shooting, I have found rate of fire, like prairie dog shooting very, very hard on barrels. One thing I also know, is the accuracy of a rifle may be fine, but due to the eroded throat, speed will fall off much faster than accuracy. :wink:
     
  16. Hazzard

    Hazzard Member

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    My experience with barrels that were "shot out" is that they were just badly fouled. I've gotten some good deals before on rifles that needed a "rebarrel" when they actually only needed a good bore scrubbing (permissum exigo caveo!). The .243 isn't really known as a barrel burner with a quality rifle such as the BAR and it would take many 1000's of rounds to cause major throat erosion. Hot loads with heavy bullets could cause this, so follow the advice of earlier posts. A bore scope may be in order.
     
  17. Native

    Native Member

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    Thanks for the info., guys.