M1 carbine information request

Discussion in 'Military Style' started by fancygapwolf, Jun 24, 2009.

  1. fancygapwolf

    fancygapwolf New Member

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    New member here....hoping to find some information about my M1 carbine. It has an Inland receiver stamped Inland Div. with a serial number 146XXX. The barrel is stamped Underwood 9-43. I would appreciate any info anyone could offer about where this rifle might have been used. Also, it has a three digit number stenciled in yellow paint on the stock. The digits are about an inch high. What do these numbers tell me and do I want to leave them on the stock or remove them ?
    Thanks...
     
  2. Papadoodles

    Papadoodles Super Member

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    First........Welcome to the forum.

    Second........you do NOT want to do anything to your carbine until you determine exactly what you have; what each item means; and what it might be worth in the current condition.

    Third........go here and read everything you can find.
    http://home.att.net/~ra-carbines/history.html

    Good luck on your project.
     

  3. fancygapwolf

    fancygapwolf New Member

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    Thanks papadoodles....lots of good information ! I am still trying (unsuccessfully) to contact the site to find out about the stenciled numbers on the stock. As to your points..... I certainly will not do anything to it until I know what I have....But I can say this much : The sucker shoots really great... at 100 yards I can eat up a target center from a sitting position, even with my less than perfect eyesight :D
     
  4. thumbuster

    thumbuster Super Member

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    The painted numbers are probably the arms room numbers. They were issued and then put back in their slot into the arms room and locked down and stored there. I used to be an S-4 and was responsible for our weapons. That's how we did it too.

    Inland made more carbines than any other maker. Lots of companies made them. Companies that before the war weren't in the gun biz. Inland was one of these companies. Over five million carbines were built all during WWII. They were issued to many countries. We issued a lot to South Vietnam and their troops liked the little rifles early in the VN war. Germans liked them in WWII. The little rifle has been often criticized for not being powerful enough. That 30 Caliber short round is about equal in power to a 32/20. However one must understand what rifles the carbine was competing with. Most other nations at the time who made little rifles and sub-machine guns loaded a 32 ACP or the standard 9mm. The carbine round delivers more energy than either one of these. So in it's field it was an elephant killer.

    I had a friend who was a Marine on Saipan. He told me, "I shot a Jap marine thirteen times in the chest with my carbine and it didn't stop him. After that I tossed my carbine and picked up an M-1."

    During WWII lots of GI's said that they'd like to have a carbine as a deer rifle. I had a pal who was a WWII GI. He got one. Right after the war he shot a black bear and her cub with one and hung both skins on his wall. He was a Latvian. He had fought with the Finns against the Soviets during the War. He said he went all the way to Stalingrad. He also said that he killed many Soviets and two T-34's. He used limpet mines to destroy the tanks. He was quite a guy and a million laughs to be around. He smoked and it killed him; we all missed him. He killed most Russians with a MG-42. He said you'd hear them charge in the morning mist shouting "E-ayi" He said the dead piled up in front of his position. Now this fellow, HATED Russians with a green passion. He had a price on his head put there by the Soviets. He couldn't go home to Latvia. Drink? Man this fellow, who was a lot older than I, could really put it away!
     
  5. thumbuster

    thumbuster Super Member

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    Years later correction: It should be Petersburg aka Leningrad....Stalingrad was a LONG ways away.